Update your browser or enable Javascript to view and use this site as designed.
Labyrinthitis and Vestibular Neuritis

Labyrinthitis and Vestibular Neuritis

Topic Overview

What is labyrinthitis?

Labyrinthitis (say "lab-uh-rin-THY-tus") is a problem deep inside the inner ear. It happens when the labyrinth, a part of the inner ear that helps control your balance, gets swollen and inflamed .

The inflammation may cause sudden vertigo . This makes you feel like you're spinning or whirling. Labyrinthitis may also cause temporary hearing loss or a ringing sound in your ears.

Your doctor may also call this vestibular neuritis . The two problems have the same symptoms and are treated the same way.

See pictures of the inner ear showing the labyrinth and an inflamed vestibular nerve .

What causes labyrinthitis?

The cause of labyrinthitis is not clear. Labyrinthitis can happen after a viral infection or, more rarely, after an infection caused by bacteria . It is often triggered by an upper respiratory infection , such as the flu or a cold. Less often, it may start after a middle ear infection.

The infection inflames the vestibular nerve. This causes the nerve to send incorrect signals to the brain that the body is moving. But your other senses (such as vision) don't detect the same movement. The confusion in signals can make you feel that the room is spinning or that you have lost your balance (vertigo).

What are the symptoms?

The main symptom of labyrinthitis is vertigo. Vertigo is not the same as feeling dizzy . Dizziness means that you feel unsteady or lightheaded. But vertigo makes you feel like you're spinning or whirling. It may make it hard for you to walk. Symptoms of vertigo and dizziness may be caused by many problems other than labyrinthitis.

With labyrinthitis, the vertigo begins without warning. It often starts 1 to 2 weeks after you've had the flu or a cold. It may be severe enough to make you vomit or make you feel sick to your stomach. Vertigo slowly goes away over a few days to weeks. But for a month or longer, you may still get vertigo symptoms if you suddenly move your head a certain way.

Labyrinthitis may also cause hearing loss and a ringing sound in your ears ( tinnitus ). Most often, these symptoms don't last for more than a few weeks.

How is labyrinthitis diagnosed?

Your doctor can tell if you have labyrinthitis by doing a physical exam and asking about your symptoms and past health. Your doctor will look for signs of viral infections that can trigger labyrinthitis.

If the cause of your vertigo is not clear, your doctor may do other tests, such as electronystagmography or an MRI to rule out other problems.

How is it treated?

Most of the time, labyrinthitis goes away on its own. This normally takes several weeks. If the cause is a bacterial infection, your doctor will give you antibiotics. But most cases are caused by viral infections, which can't be cured with antibiotics.

Your doctor may prescribe steroid medicines , which may help you get better sooner. He or she may also give you other medicines, such as antiemetics, antihistamines, and sedatives, to help control the nausea and vomiting caused by vertigo.

Vertigo usually gets better as your body adjusts ( compensation ). Medicines like antihistamines can help your symptoms, but they may make it take longer for vertigo to go away. It's best to only use medicines when they are needed and for as little time as possible.

Staying active can help you get better. Check with your doctor about trying balance exercises at home. These include simple head movements and keeping your balance while standing and sitting. They may reduce symptoms of vertigo.

Health Tools Health Tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.

Health Tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.


Actionsets help people take an active role in managing a health condition. Actionsets are designed to help people take an active role in managing a health condition.
  Vertigo: Balance Exercises

Other Places To Get Help

Organizations

American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS)
1650 Diagonal Road
Alexandria, VA  22314-2857
Phone: (703) 836-4444
Web Address: www.entnet.org
 

The American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) is the world's largest organization of physicians dedicated to the care of ear, nose, and throat (ENT) disorders. Its Web site includes information for the general public on ENT disorders.


American Hearing Research Foundation
8 South Michigan Avenue
Suite 1205
Chicago, IL  60603-4539
Phone: (312) 726-9670
Fax: (312) 726-9695
Web Address: www.american-hearing.org
 

The American Hearing Research Foundation helps pay for research into hearing and balance disorders and also helps to educate the public about these disorders. On their website you can find general information on many common ear disorders, including descriptions, causes, diagnoses, and treatments. References are also included as a source for further information. The American Hearing Research Foundation also publishes a newsletter, available by subscription, as well as a number of pamphlets on a variety of topics.


National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication DisordersNational Institutes of Health
31 Center Drive, MSC 2320
Bethesda, MD  20892-2320
Phone: 1-800-241-1044
TDD: 1-800-241-1055
Fax: (301) 402-0018
Email: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov
Web Address: www.nidcd.nih.gov
 

The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, advances research in all aspects of human communication and helps people who have communication disorders. The website has information about hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech, and language.


Vestibular Disorders Association (VEDA)
P.O. Box 13305
Portland, OR  97213-0305
Phone: 1-800-837-8428
Phone: (503) 229-7705
Fax: (503) 229-8064
Web Address: www.vestibular.org
 

This organization provides information and support for people with dizziness, balance disorders, and related hearing problems. A quarterly newsletter, fact sheets, booklets, videotapes, a list of other members in your area, and information about centers and doctors specializing in balance disorders are all available to members.


References

Other Works Consulted

  • Daroff RB (2008). Dizziness and vertigo. In AS Fauci et al., eds., Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 17th ed., vol. 1, pp. 144–147. New York: McGraw-Hill Medical.
  • Hillier SL, McDonnell M (2011). Vestibular rehabilitation for unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2).

Credits

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Anne C. Poinier, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Barrie J. Hurwitz, MD - Neurology
Last Revised October 3, 2011

Last Revised: October 3, 2011

Healthwise
Help
Healthwise Index

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. How this information was developed to help you make better health decisions.

© 1995-2013 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.