New Topics and Topic Updates

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What's New in the Healthwise® Knowledgebase

Version 10.9

May 2016

What's New in the Healthwise Knowledgebase lists new documents, noteworthy enhancements to existing documents, and medically significant changes to existing documents. We do not list every change, such as editorial changes, made for this release. Refer to Tech Docs for a complete list of new and updated documents.

  • New Health and Disease Topics
  • New Illustrations
  • New NCI Topics
  • New Medication Topics
  • New Aisle 7 (CAM) Content
  • Enhanced Content
  • CDC Vaccination Information Statements and Immunization Schedules
  • Actionset Updates
  • Decision Point Updates
  • Health and Disease Topic Updates
  • Illustration, Interactive Health Tool, and Online Form Updates
  • NCI Topic Updates
  • Medication Topic Updates
  • Aisle 7 (CAM) Content Updates
  • Topic Title Changes and Topic Replacements
  • Medical Guideline Review
  • What's Next

New Health and Disease Topics

New NCI Topics

Refer to Tech Docs for a complete list of new National Cancer Institute content.

New Medication Topics

Medication topics from Cerner Multum, Inc., are not included in all systems. Added topics may include new information and/or the addition of new drug names. Refer to Tech Docs for a complete list of new titles.

New Aisle 7 (CAM) Content

Refer to Tech Docs for a complete list of new Aisle 7 (CAM) content.

Enhanced Content

Starting with this release, Version 10.9, enhanced content is now listed in one of the following Updates sections, as appropriate: Actionset Updates, Decision Point Updates, Health and Disease Updates, or Medical Test Topic Updates.

CDC Vaccination Information Statements and Immunization Schedules

CDC Vaccine Information Statements

There are no new or updated Vaccine Information Statements for Version 10.9.

CDC Immunization Schedules

The CDC revised these immunization schedules:

  • Adult Immunization Schedule (zm6386)
  • Childhood Immunization Catch-Up Schedule: Ages 4 Months to 18 Years (zm6387)
  • Childhood Immunization Schedule: Ages 0 to 6 Years (abq4567)

Actionset Updates

We continually monitor changes in medicine to ensure our topics are accurate and up-to-date. In the following documents, we made medically significant revisions, added new medical information, or removed outdated medical information. While medically significant changes are listed here, documents that have minor revisions, such as editorial or consistency changes, are not listed.

Healthy eating and heart-healthy foods: In the following documents, we removed the general restrictions on dietary cholesterol and eggs for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. This change was based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020.

Decision Point Updates

We continually monitor changes in medicine to ensure our topics are accurate and up-to-date. In the following documents, we made medically significant revisions, added new medical information, or removed outdated medical information. While medically significant changes are listed here, documents that have minor revisions, such as editorial or consistency changes, are not listed.

  • Diabetes: Should I Get Pregnant? : In Get the Facts under "What should you do before you get pregnant when you have diabetes?" we now say that the recommended A1c range for pregnant women is 6% to 6.5% to reflect the American Diabetes Association's Standards for Medical Care—2106 guideline.
  • Lumbar Herniated Disc: Should I Have Surgery? : We revised this decision aid to include the most recent information about the benefits and risks of having surgery for lumbar herniated disc. We updated the numbers in this decision aid to show how many people were symptom-free or almost symptom-free within 3 months, within 1 year, and within 2 years after surgery. And we added numbers to show how people who were assigned to have surgery soon and people who were assigned to try nonsurgical treatments for 6 months (followed by surgery if their symptoms didn't improve) rated their recovery at 2 months and at 1 year. We also updated the numbers that show the serious risks of surgery for herniated disc—wound problems, nerve damage, and having symptoms that don't get better or having new symptoms in the future.
  • Prediabetes: Which Treatment Should I Use to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? : In Get the Facts under "What do numbers tell us about treatments to prevent type 2 diabetes," we now include 15-year follow-up data. We also updated the image that represents the data.
  • Supraventricular Tachycardia: Should I Have Catheter Ablation? : In Get the Facts under "Your options," we added that this document is for adults with SVT. In Get the Facts under "How well does catheter ablation work?" we added that how well it works can depend on the type of SVT. These success rates cover the more common SVT types called AVNRT (atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia) and AVRT (atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia). We revised the efficacy and risk estimates based on the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Rhythm Society 2015 Guideline for the management of adult patients with supraventricular tachycardia.

Health and Disease Topic Updates

We continually monitor changes in medicine to ensure our topics are accurate and up-to-date. In the following documents, we made medically significant revisions, added new medical information, or removed outdated medical information. While medically significant changes are listed here, documents that have minor revisions, such as editorial or consistency changes, are not listed.

  • Asthma in Children : We added mepolizumab as another treatment option for severe allergic asthma when symptoms aren't relieved by avoiding allergens or by taking standard medicines.
  • Asthma in Teens and Adults : We added mepolizumab as another treatment option for severe allergic asthma when symptoms aren't relieved by avoiding allergens or by taking standard medicines.
  • Automated Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring : We added information about wearing blood pressure monitors throughout the day to double-check whether high readings are actually high blood pressure, based on the 2015 USPSTF statement on blood pressure screening.
  • Blood Pressure Screening : We updated the screening intervals for blood pressure and added information about wearing blood pressure monitors throughout the day to double-check whether high readings are actually high blood pressure, based on the 2015 USPSTF statement on blood pressure screening.
  • Chlamydia : We updated the CDC recommendation for screening.
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome : We added systemic exertion intolerance disease (SEID) and myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) as other names for CFS.
  • Diabetes: Blood Sugar Levels : We now say that the recommended A1c range for pregnant women is 6% to 6.5%, to reflect the American Diabetes Association's Standards for Medical Care—2106 guideline.
  • Dietary Guidelines for Good Health : Based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015–2020, we added information about reducing the intake of added sugar to less than 10% of overall daily calories. We removed the restriction on dietary cholesterol.
  • Endocarditis : We added that you may have follow-up visits for months or years to check the health of your heart.
  • Gonorrhea : We updated the CDC recommendation for screening.
  • Hepatitis C : We added having HIV infection as a reason to be tested for hepatitis C, based on updated recommendations from the CDC.
  • Medical Checkups for Adolescents : We added language regarding screening for depression.
  • Migraine Headaches: We removed butterbur as an alternative treatment because there are safety concerns.
  • Noninsulin Medicines for Type 2 Diabetes : We changed the title and added information about noninsulin injectable medicines for type 2 diabetes.
  • Pulmonary Embolism :
    • Exams and Tests: We deleted that arterial blood gas is used to test for risk of pulmonary embolism.
  • Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing : We updated the CDC recommendations for chlamydia and gonorrhea screening.
  • Travel Health : In "Insect-borne disease" under Precautions Along the Way, we added Zika virus to the list of diseases, with a link to additional information.
  • Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With the Disease : Based on the American Diabetes Association's Standards of Medical Care—2016 guideline, we changed the recommended age to begin testing cholesterol levels to at least 10 years old.
  • Type 2 Diabetes: Screening for Adults : We updated the USPSTF recommendation for testing for abnormal glucose.

Healthy eating and heart-healthy foods: In the following topics, we removed the general restrictions on dietary cholesterol and eggs for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. This change was based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015–2020.

Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT): We added that treatment is based on the type of SVT and shared decision making. We removed the specific treatment options for AVNRT and AVRT, because the details are similar to SVT. We added more detail about vagal maneuvers to try to stop episodes of supraventricular tachycardia. We now use the examples of bearing down and an ice-cold, wet towel.

Illustration, Interactive Health Tool, and Online Form Updates

In the following documents, we made medically significant revisions, added new medical information, or removed outdated medical information. While medically significant changes are listed here, documents that have minor revisions, such as editorial or consistency changes, are not listed.

Illustration updates

Interactive health tool updates

  • The Interactive Tool: Which Health Screenings Do You Need? was revised to address the latest USPSTF recommendations. In the Recommended Tests section, prediabetes was added to the Type 2 diabetes content, and the age ranges for chlamydia and gonorrhea testing were expanded to include females younger than 25.

Online form updates

NCI Topic Updates

Refer to Tech Docs for a complete list of updated National Cancer Institute content.

Medication Topic Updates

Medication topics from Cerner Multum, Inc. are not included in all systems. Updates may include new information and/or the addition of new drug names. Refer to Tech Docs for a complete list of updated titles.

Aisle 7 (CAM) Content Updates

Refer to Tech Docs for a complete list of updated Aisle 7 (CAM) content.

Topic Title Changes and Topic Replacements

Topic title changes

Topic replacements

We archived the following searchable topics, and we name the replacement topics below. Refer to Tech Docs for a complete list of archived documents.

  • Hepatitis C: Should I Take Antiviral Medicine has been removed. You can find related content in Hepatitis C .
  • When Should I Start Taking Antiretroviral Medicines for HIV Infection? has been removed. You can find related content in Antiretroviral Medicines for HIV .

Medical Guideline Review

To ensure the medical accuracy and consistency of Healthwise consumer health content, our medical content specialists, physicians, and librarians regularly review medical guidelines and association statements, gold-standard journals, news, and evidence-based publications and databases.

The medical guidelines listed below are examples of updated guidelines we reviewed for this release.

  • American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases—Infectious Diseases Society of America (2015). Recommendations for testing, managing, and treating hepatitis C.
  • American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Rhythm Society (2015). Guideline for the management of adult patients with supraventricular tachycardia.
  • American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Society for Cardiac Angiography and Interventions (2015). Focused update on primary percutaneous coronary intervention for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction.
  • American College of Physicians (2015). Evaluation of patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism: Best practice advice from the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians.
  • American Diabetes Association (2016). Standards of medical care in diabetes—2016.
  • American Heart Association (2015). Infective endocarditis in adults: Diagnosis, antimicrobial therapy, and management of complications. A scientific statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association.
  • American Heart Association (2015). Infective endocarditis in childhood: 2015 update. A scientific statement from the American Heart Association.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2015). Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines.
  • Department of Health and Human Services. Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (2016). Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-infected adults and adolescents.
  • Department of Health and Human Services. Panel on Antiretroviral Therapy and Medical Management of HIV-Infected Children (2015). Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in pediatric HIV infection.
  • Pediatrics. Committee on Practice and Ambulatory Medicine, Bright Futures Periodicity Schedule Working Group (2016). 2016 recommendations for preventive pediatric health care.
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Agriculture (2015). 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 8th ed.
  • U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (2015). Screening for abnormal blood glucose and type 2 diabetes mellitus: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.
  • U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (2015). Screening for breast cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

What's Next

New topics

The following topics are a sample of the topics that are being developed. They are expected to release within the next six months.

  • Candidiasis of the skin
  • Caregiving for diabetes
  • Medicare wellness visit
  • Substance withdrawal in infants